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  • The journalist obviously doesn't take his job seriously, will be fired and humiliated shortly....
  • FTA:

    Journalist reports on subway incident and connects it to recent murder. No journalist present.

    I'm assuming a photojournalist wasn't there either. You can usually distinguish them from the camera they have dangling around their necks, which apparently doubles as a good signaling device in an emergency situation.
  • The real follow-up story from the earlier incident -- the one I note that most of the media is ignoring -- is that that photographer, who has been interviewed about the incident, says he was much too far way from the stricken man to have helped him. He started running to attempt to get there in time and triggered his flash 47 times to try to warn the train's driver. At the last minute he snapped his photo on the run. Several people were standing right there watching the man struggle to get out of the track well and they did nothing to help.
  • Journalist man subway New York

    encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.comView Full Size

    You, New York. Why is it always you?
  • Frantic straphangers hood ornament candidates began yelling across the platform to "help him, help him."

    Fixed
  • TFA: "another man who tried to pull him to safety somehow fell to the tracks, as well."

    Somehow? He was the only firm hand-hold for a panicking motherfarker facing death.
    Unless he was experienced at this sort of thing, it'd be more surprising if he *weren't* yanked off his feet.

    Trying to rescue people who are afraid for their lives is some risky shiat.
  • Something I just don't understand about subways in the states. Keep in mind that I live a town without subways. The trains stop at the station in pre-arranged, consistent positions. This is why they have the tape laid out that shows where the doors will be. So why the fark don't they have railings along the damn edges!??!
  • DSF6969: Something I just don't understand about subways in the states. Keep in mind that I live a town without subways. The trains stop at the station in pre-arranged, consistent positions. This is why they have the tape laid out that shows where the doors will be. So why the fark don't they have railings along the damn edges!??!


    They could do that but it would be very dangerous. The well for the train is just big enough for the train to fit with only a couple of inches of clearance. Those trains enter the stations pretty darned fast. What if, when doing so, someone had bent one of the railing inward? (some rough-housing boys would surely do so) The train would hit it and the driver or a passenger on the platform would probably be killed. At the very least, the train would derail.
  • The real question is, why don't they have recessed hand and foot holdings lit up all around where the trains come in. That way if you're on the farking tracks, you've got but 5-10ft to get to something you can climb the fark out with.

    And if you ever do try to rescue someone, lay flat on your belly so they are less likely to drag you in.
  • DSF6969: Something I just don't understand about subways in the states. Keep in mind that I live a town without subways. The trains stop at the station in pre-arranged, consistent positions. This is why they have the tape laid out that shows where the doors will be. So why the fark don't they have railings along the damn edges!??!


    Or suicide pits under the rails.
  • DSF6969: So why the fark don't they have railings along the damn edges!??!


    Just a guess here:

    More people would be killed by trains because they were sitting, standing, or doing circus tricks on the railings before they fell.
  • Holocaust Agnostic: DSF6969: Something I just don't understand about subways in the states. Keep in mind that I live a town without subways. The trains stop at the station in pre-arranged, consistent positions. This is why they have the tape laid out that shows where the doors will be. So why the fark don't they have railings along the damn edges!??!

    Or suicide pits under the rails.


    I think they don't have pits because it fills with debris and rats. Seriously. But I don't know why they couldn't have recessed hollows people could use as a ladder to climb out.
  • Gulper Eel: Because the Daily News is the tabloid that finds crass exploitation of violent death beneath them, amirite?
    (warning: graphic...but it was on page 1)


    From 1979, I know you want to make excuses for the NY Post, but you couldn't get a more recent example?
  • This highlights what the armchair heroes keep ignoring: there's is an enormous component of self-risk when trying to hoist someone out of subway tracks with seconds to spare. You give that hand, you're committed.
  • cwsfa: DSF6969: So why the fark don't they have railings along the damn edges!??!

    Just a guess here:

    More people would be killed by trains because they were sitting, standing, or doing circus tricks on the railings before they fell.


    Solid sheets of safetyglass that reach all the way to the ceiling.
  • JackieRabbit: DSF6969: Something I just don't understand about subways in the states. Keep in mind that I live a town without subways. The trains stop at the station in pre-arranged, consistent positions. This is why they have the tape laid out that shows where the doors will be. So why the fark don't they have railings along the damn edges!??!

    They could do that but it would be very dangerous. The well for the train is just big enough for the train to fit with only a couple of inches of clearance. Those trains enter the stations pretty darned fast. What if, when doing so, someone had bent one of the railing inward? (some rough-housing boys would surely do so) The train would hit it and the driver or a passenger on the platform would probably be killed. At the very least, the train would derail.


    In that case, build cement barriers. Or even floor-to-ceiling bars. That would eliminate the idiots who would sit or stand on top of the barriers. I just think there has got to be more that can be done to fix this.
  • JackieRabbit: The real follow-up story from the earlier incident -- the one I note that most of the media is ignoring -- is that that photographer, who has been interviewed about the incident, says he was much too far way from the stricken man to have helped him. He started running to attempt to get there in time and triggered his flash 47 times to try to warn the train's driver. At the last minute he snapped his photo on the run. Several people were standing right there watching the man struggle to get out of the track well and they did nothing to help.



    Sure, that's what the photographer said. Oddly the very pictures he shot directly contradict his statements. They appear to be taken from a fairly close distance, and you can see no other passengers in between the camera and the victim. Also, if the photographer really were running towards the man he wouldn't have a clear picture as the camera wouldn't be steadied. Finally, he fired his flash 47 times? You're telling me that in the heat of the moment with a train bearing down on the victim the photographer counted how many times he fired his flash?

    All due respect, but everything you said sounds like complete horses hit.
  • DSF6969: Something I just don't understand about subways in the states. Keep in mind that I live a town without subways. The trains stop at the station in pre-arranged, consistent positions. This is why they have the tape laid out that shows where the doors will be. So why the fark don't they have railings along the damn edges!??!


    Or even better, make it like the subways in Singapore, or airport trains in freaking everywhere: totally isolate the platform from the tracks. There's a wall with doors at the edge of the platform, the train pulls up with it's doors lined up to the station doors, then both open.

    \Cleverly, in Singapore they also have areas marked on the station where you're supposed to wait away from the doors until people are done exiting. And people actually do it.
  • downtownkid: Sure, that's what the photographer said. Oddly the very pictures he shot directly contradict his statements. They appear to be taken from a fairly close distance, and you can see no other passengers in between the camera and the victim. Also, if the photographer really were running towards the man he wouldn't have a clear picture as the camera wouldn't be steadied. Finally, he fired his flash 47 times? You're telling me that in the heat of the moment with a train bearing down on the victim the photographer counted how many times he fired his flash?


    Well, to be fair, his camera probably indirectly counted how many times he fired his flash, because the easiest way to fire the flash is by hitting the shutter.
  • JackieRabbit: DSF6969: Something I just don't understand about subways in the states. Keep in mind that I live a town without subways. The trains stop at the station in pre-arranged, consistent positions. This is why they have the tape laid out that shows where the doors will be. So why the fark don't they have railings along the damn edges!??!

    They could do that but it would be very dangerous. The well for the train is just big enough for the train to fit with only a couple of inches of clearance. Those trains enter the stations pretty darned fast. What if, when doing so, someone had bent one of the railing inward? (some rough-housing boys would surely do so) The train would hit it and the driver or a passenger on the platform would probably be killed. At the very least, the train would derail.


    At the very least, a handrail that had been bent by ruffians, could derail a train? Please try harder with your brain tool.

    /other points are fair enough
  • cwsfa: DSF6969: So why the fark don't they have railings along the damn edges!??!

    Just a guess here:

    More people would be killed by trains because they were sitting, standing, or doing circus tricks on the railings before they fell.


    That's just Darwin in action. To stop a murder like what happened this week would be worth it.
  • downtownkid: JackieRabbit: The real follow-up story from the earlier incident -- the one I note that most of the media is ignoring -- is that that photographer, who has been interviewed about the incident, says he was much too far way from the stricken man to have helped him. He started running to attempt to get there in time and triggered his flash 47 times to try to warn the train's driver. At the last minute he snapped his photo on the run. Several people were standing right there watching the man struggle to get out of the track well and they did nothing to help.


    Sure, that's what the photographer said. Oddly the very pictures he shot directly contradict his statements. They appear to be taken from a fairly close distance, and you can see no other passengers in between the camera and the victim. Also, if the photographer really were running towards the man he wouldn't have a clear picture as the camera wouldn't be steadied. Finally, he fired his flash 47 times? You're telling me that in the heat of the moment with a train bearing down on the victim the photographer counted how many times he fired his flash?

    All due respect, but everything you said sounds like complete horses hit.


    That's exactly right. That scumbag "photojournalist" can go DIAF. He didn't even have to attempt to rescue the guy, it's just his self-righteous, lame-a** excuse and a perfect picture that angered me. What a colossal douche.  He makes me sick.
  • DSF6969: JackieRabbit: DSF6969: Something I just don't understand about subways in the states. Keep in mind that I live a town without subways. The trains stop at the station in pre-arranged, consistent positions. This is why they have the tape laid out that shows where the doors will be. So why the fark don't they have railings along the damn edges!??!

    They could do that but it would be very dangerous. The well for the train is just big enough for the train to fit with only a couple of inches of clearance. Those trains enter the stations pretty darned fast. What if, when doing so, someone had bent one of the railing inward? (some rough-housing boys would surely do so) The train would hit it and the driver or a passenger on the platform would probably be killed. At the very least, the train would derail.

    In that case, build cement barriers. Or even floor-to-ceiling bars. That would eliminate the idiots who would sit or stand on top of the barriers. I just think there has got to be more that can be done to fix this.


    Is there really tape that the train doors line-up with in NYC?

    Barriers would require extensive renovations to 400 something subway stations that date back up to a century. Would rather see them just encourage people to stand back from the edge while running trains more frequently to prevent overcrowding on platforms.
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