Real News. Real Funny.

Comments

  • They must have inked a lucrative deal.
  • Hell. I like watching the squid boats at night.
  • Fishermen are also not much affected by the early end to the season. Most will go on to fish for sardines, salmon and other bounties of the Pacific, said Diane Pleschner-Steele, director of the California Wetfish Producers Association, an industry group for squid, sardine, anchovy and mackerel processors and fishermen.


    How is that possible? They made the maximum amount of money by law four months early. So everything from that point on is a bonus. It would be a great thing for the crew as long as its commission and not salary they benefit from.
  • What's got eight arms and kills its girlfriend?

    Squid Vicious.
  • I have an inkling for calamari right now
  • Humboldt squid are freakin' scary things.
  • MaudlinMutantMollusk: No squidding?


    Squidding:
    v. 'to squid'.by A sexual technique whereby immediately prior to the male's ejaculation the female's parent, boyfriend or other threat enters the room. The male then turns to face the intruder, ejaculating onto them, there creating a distraction and allowing an expedient getaway. From the method by which squid spray ink at predators to ease escape.
  • Spare a couple squid, guv'?
  • Unseasonably warm waters, massive increase in low-oxygen waters off California coast, and you get a population boom in lanternfish, one of the few fish that enjoy that environment and are not commercially fished. As a result, you get a population explosion of jumbo squid. That's not a good thing - that population explosion is chewing its way through pretty much everything else at that depth. You're seeing the precursor to a drop in fishing hauls over the next two years or so in other, more desirable fish, because the warm, low-oxygen water can't support those fish. Instead, you'll see this lovely boom in critters we don't eat, and the critters that eat them, even as California's fishing industry suffers for it.
  • But I watched that documentary "Soylent Green" and it said the oceans were dead.....What gives?
  • I watched a documentary about commercial fishing the other day. We've pretty much fished ourselves into a corner. We SHOULD only fish x amount to help the fish population recover. The maximum quota that the UN set is 2(x); what we actually fish is 8(x). ( I've forgotten the actual numbers) We've caused several species to go onto the endagered species list.

    / the documentary is called "The End of the Line" and is available to watch on Hulu. It is scary to say the least
  • Yakk: [www.fandompost.com image 480x290]


    I take it from the watering eyes that she discovered the beak?
  • i3.photobucket.comView Full Size


    i3.photobucket.comView Full Size


    JohnnyC: Humboldt squid are freakin' scary things.

     

    few years back in San Deigo, there was an earthquake offshore, about a 2-3 on the Richter Scale. I felt it but barely. Couple of hours later, there were hundreds of Humboldts washing up onshore. This poor guy, we tried to rescue. That's me on the far left.

    There was a lifeguard there, and he said not to touch them, but if we wanted to try to get him back in the water, we could do so. we did, but he didn't do much. he just barely moved when we got him int he water.

    later, there were storeis where oceanographers / marine biologists theorized teh earthquake dicked up the water temperatures (or created an "inversion", i think they said), as i guess Humboldts feed in cold water. Most of them died. pretty sad.

    what was pretty cool was how the guy radiated colors. when we got close he started radiating these reddish / orange bands down his body.
  • JohnnyC: Humboldt squid are freakin' scary things.


    So true. I saw a documentary about them and it scared the shiat out of me. I am terrified of deep water anyway, so the odds of me being in the ocean where they live are slim-to-none, but watching how they stalk their prey and how vicious they are is frighteningly fascinating.

    Resident Muslim: Damn global warming.


    Actually, FTA, the result of the squid population is La Nina, which causes cold water. The squid thrive in cooler temperatures.
  • rickythepenguin: [i3.photobucket.com image 640x480]

    [i3.photobucket.com image 400x315]

    JohnnyC: Humboldt squid are freakin' scary things. 

    few years back in San Deigo, there was an earthquake offshore, about a 2-3 on the Richter Scale. I felt it but barely. Couple of hours later, there were hundreds of Humboldts washing up onshore. This poor guy, we tried to rescue. That's me on the far left.

    There was a lifeguard there, and he said not to touch them, but if we wanted to try to get him back in the water, we could do so. we did, but he didn't do much. he just barely moved when we got him int he water.

    later, there were storeis where oceanographers / marine biologists theorized teh earthquake dicked up the water temperatures (or created an "inversion", i think they said), as i guess Humboldts feed in cold water. Most of them died. pretty sad.

    what was pretty cool was how the guy radiated colors. when we got close he started radiating these reddish / orange bands down his body.


    You're right that was a Dick move.
  • FormlessOne: Unseasonably warm waters, massive increase in low-oxygen waters off California coast, and you get a population boom in lanternfish, one of the few fish that enjoy that environment and are not commercially fished. As a result, you get a population explosion of jumbo squid. That's not a good thing - that population explosion is chewing its way through pretty much everything else at that depth. You're seeing the precursor to a drop in fishing hauls over the next two years or so in other, more desirable fish, because the warm, low-oxygen water can't support those fish. Instead, you'll see this lovely boom in critters we don't eat, and the critters that eat them, even as California's fishing industry suffers for it.


    You know how I know you didn't read TFA?
  • Dungeness crab, the second-biggest fishery - which is currently frozen by a labor strike - brings in half that.


    Nooooooooooooo!
  • Anastacya: JohnnyC: Humboldt squid are freakin' scary things.

    So true. I saw a documentary about them and it scared the shiat out of me. I am terrified of deep water anyway, so the odds of me being in the ocean where they live are slim-to-none, but watching how they stalk their prey and how vicious they are is frighteningly fascinating.


    I find them more frightening than sharks. Yes, sharks are obviously dangerous, but squid seem to 'think' more than sharks do and by way of that become far scarier. I'm no fan of deep water either (especially ocean water)... There isn't much in the waters of Michigan that is actually dangerous, but I'm still not comfortable in water that I can't see/touch the bottom of.

    rickythepenguin: what was pretty cool was how the guy radiated colors. when we got close he started radiating these reddish / orange bands down his body.


    That was the "if I could, I would drag you under and drown you, and then eat chunks of you" color pattern. You were trying to save it and it just wanted to kill you. Haha!
  • jasnotron: But I watched that documentary "Soylent Green" and it said the oceans were dead.....What gives?


    Farking hell, now I want some saltines.
  • Load 22 of 22 newer comments

This thread is closed to new comments.