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  • Ooh, Whisky thread.

    I just got myself a bottle of Armorik which I hadn't tried before. Good, smooth, but a little pricey for the quality.

    I still think the best quality/value is Glenfiddich 15.
  • Subby said Whiskey not whisky. Philistyne!
  • I thought maybe this would be some sort of Ocean's Eleven scheme to steal really good whiskey in ten hours.
  • Rixel: Subby said Whiskey not whisky. Philistyne!


    It's spelled B-o-u-r-b-o-n. Make a note of it.
  • Step 1. Slowly Drive to the liquor store.
    Step 2. Buy a bottle of 10-year-old whisky.
    Step 3. Drive home even slower.
    Step 4. Wait the rest of the 10 hours staring against a wall.
    Step 5. Drink.
  • Drill the bottom out, seal with wax.
  • Baby a small batch of the good stuff and fund it with turpentine production catering to varnish makers and Irishmen.
  • Errol Flynn famously said he liked his women young and his whiskey old, and indeed most high-end whiskeys have been aged for 10 to 20 years.

    I like my women like I like my whiskey: 15 years old and mixed up with coke.

    /oblig
  • Damn, I thought this was going to be an article about rapidly aging whiskey with nanotechnology.

    /Picked up a little bottle of Blanton's single-barrel bourbon the other day.
    //It's pretty good. But I also usually buy cheap booze, so anything that's not Jim Beam or Old Monk is fancy by my standards.
  • I dont get it, and I did rtfa, thrice.
    I did like this in the correction part

    Lastly, the article originally stated that experts agreed that bourbon doesn't necessarily get better with age, but the question is under considerable debate.

    I say that it does, to a point. For Bourbon, even in really good casks- 10 years max. 7-9 yr olds, if good stuff are awesome. I have had some older ones and they were just awful. I had a similar experience with a 35 yr Scotch. I have had some awesome 30s, many in thier twenties, and had so looked forward to this wee dram. Sorry- I know- csb . I do share as i do know a little bit about Whiskies. Its kinda my jorb.
  • I'm more interested in aging beer in ten hours.

    Subby is a failed being, and I completely agree with Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy
  • Why mess around with 10-year whiskey when perfectly good 15-, 18-, 25- and 30-years exist?
  • I recall reading about the furor over winemakers "cheating" by aging with wood chips instead of wooden BARRELS. Due to the vastly increased surface area, it achieves a similar product in weeks instead of years. The EU strictly outlawed this practice, up until 2006. The French have been denouncing it ever since.

    The process of aging is not magic, a materially identical effect can generally be had from science. But it's not always simple- oxygenation affects the flavor through oxidation, for example, but carefully pumping oxygen can achieve the same results much faster. Any particular component is just a chemical, and you could probably produce it in gallons in a short time if you understood its nature. Neither one radiates out magic time radiation.

    If I were doing it, honestly, for full process control you'd want the different flavor components identified, made independently by whatever technology maximizes them with a measurable process control, and blend them to produce an ideal product with absolute consistency. Far more cost-effective, you get exactly what you're looking for without endless trial-and-error, and you can reproduce what you did over and over.
  • Change the label?

    /Runs and hides
  • Whiskey is oak-tea made out of the residue of beer. Sorry, I'll stick to port.
  • Oznog: I recall reading about the furor over winemakers "cheating" by aging with wood chips instead of wooden BARRELS. Due to the vastly increased surface area, it achieves a similar product in weeks instead of years. The EU strictly outlawed this practice, up until 2006. The French have been denouncing it ever since.

    The process of aging is not magic, a materially identical effect can generally be had from science. But it's not always simple- oxygenation affects the flavor through oxidation, for example, but carefully pumping oxygen can achieve the same results much faster. Any particular component is just a chemical, and you could probably produce it in gallons in a short time if you understood its nature. Neither one radiates out magic time radiation.

    If I were doing it, honestly, for full process control you'd want the different flavor components identified, made independently by whatever technology maximizes them with a measurable process control, and blend them to produce an ideal product with absolute consistency. Far more cost-effective, you get exactly what you're looking for without endless trial-and-error, and you can reproduce what you did over and over.


    I can get where you are coming from, and I am not a luddite by any means, but whisky is best made from an artistic / alchemist standpoint, imho. Heart and soul, not a sliderule. Can you dig it ?
  • alienated: I can get where you are coming from, and I am not a luddite by any means, but whisky is best made from an artistic / alchemist standpoint, imho. Heart and soul, not a sliderule. Can you dig it ?


    Ah, so, you're not a luddite, just a religious kook.
  • alienated: I can get where you are coming from, and I am not a luddite by any means, but whisky is best made from an artistic / alchemist standpoint, imho. Heart and soul, not a sliderule. Can you dig it ?


    Agreed. Making McWhiskey would be...wrong somehow.

    There's a psychological aspect to knowing that the product you're enjoying took effort and passion, and was made the hard way, that improves the enjoyment.

    Of course, you could probably bottle the neurotransmitters that produce that emotion too. Okay, maybe I am turning into a Luddite.
  • for the low low price o $225 I could be a whisky snob.
    http://www.winnipegwhiskyfestival.com /event-overview.html#eventovervi e w

    Explore and appreciate more than 100 varieties of Scotch, Irish, Bourbon,
    Tennessee, Canadian and even Swedish whiskies. Whether you're interested
    in learning or are the most discerning of whisky lovers, there is something for
    everyone during this unique evening.
    Along with the wide array of whiskies you will enjoy a diverse selection
    of mouthwatering cuisine available throughout the entire evening AND all
    attendees will receive a souvenir Glencairn Whisky Glass.
  • Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: alienated: I can get where you are coming from, and I am not a luddite by any means, but whisky is best made from an artistic / alchemist standpoint, imho. Heart and soul, not a sliderule. Can you dig it ?

    Agreed. Making McWhiskey would be...wrong somehow.

    There's a psychological aspect to knowing that the product you're enjoying took effort and passion, and was made the hard way, that improves the enjoyment.

    Of course, you could probably bottle the neurotransmitters that produce that emotion too. Okay, maybe I am turning into a Luddite.


    Sounds like making wine. My father tries so many different recipes every fermentation. Still ends up with some strong shiat. .

    /Not into home brewery but damn, love to drink it.
  • Cozret: alienated: I can get where you are coming from, and I am not a luddite by any means, but whisky is best made from an artistic / alchemist standpoint, imho. Heart and soul, not a sliderule. Can you dig it ?

    Ah, so, you're not a luddite, just a religious kook.


    My first batch of all grain beer that I helped brew was on the back of a small toyota pickup at the Cilurzo Winery in Temecula, Cal, at the 2nd SOCAL homebrewers festival. We brewed 2 barrels of pale ale.
    It was awesome. and hardcore work- we mashed thick and that boat oar got rather heavy and hard to use.We did a partial decoction mash.

    I am a pagan buddhist, but, that has nothing to do with how i brew or vint things.
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