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  • In the end when legalization comes--and it will--there will still be folks looking to sell on the streetcorner or out of their apartments, and it will be much like moonshine:

    GOD*AMN REVENOOOOOORS!

    But at least the jail time will be easier for tax evasion...
  • I want to know why the damned prices haven't come down considering the supplies these days
  • MaudlinMutantMollusk: I want to know why the damned prices haven't come down considering the supplies these days


    Because they can't just buy huge machines to automate the process.

    The precautions required to evade detection make the production of drugs very labor intensive. Grocery-store cashiers, for instance, are more than 100 times as productive as retail drug sellers in terms of items sold per labor hour. Similarly, hired hands working for crack dealers can fill about 100 vials per hour, whereas even older-model sugar-packing machines can fill between 500 and 1,000 sugar packets per minute. This labor intensity of drug production, combined with the high wages demanded for that labor, are what drive up the costs of drugs; by comparison, materials and supplies - glassine bags, gram balances, and even guns - are relatively cheap.
  • It's because of the union

    Local 404 represent!

    www.jayandsilentbob.comView Full Size
  • MaudlinMutantMollusk: I want to know why the damned prices haven't come down considering the supplies these days


    Give it time. For now the whole legalization thing is in 2 states, and is brand new. It's also still illegal under federal law, so that will still be in the cost for a while before legal local growers get up to speed (takes a while for plants to grow after all).
  • Looks like a bag o' schwag.

    www.thestranger.comView Full Size
  • FishyFred: MaudlinMutantMollusk: I want to know why the damned prices haven't come down considering the supplies these days

    Because they can't just buy huge machines to automate the process.

    The precautions required to evade detection make the production of drugs very labor intensive. Grocery-store cashiers, for instance, are more than 100 times as productive as retail drug sellers in terms of items sold per labor hour. Similarly, hired hands working for crack dealers can fill about 100 vials per hour, whereas even older-model sugar-packing machines can fill between 500 and 1,000 sugar packets per minute. This labor intensity of drug production, combined with the high wages demanded for that labor, are what drive up the costs of drugs; by comparison, materials and supplies - glassine bags, gram balances, and even guns - are relatively cheap.


    Oh god, I could just imagine having a case of cocaine packets. One helluva weekend.
  • FishyFred: Because they can't just buy huge machines to automate the process.


    Well, good. I like the artisanal touches that go into illegal drugs. That little smiley-face stenciled on to each tab of ecstasy... the baroque charm of the bong you made out of your high school wood shop project... the little pinch of chili powder in your crystal meth. You'll miss these things when Nabisco™ takes over the industry and prices all the craft-drug makers out of business.
  • aren't they both getting it from the same grower?

    /spoiled here in southern CA, it's hard to find shiatty buds.
  • hubiestubert: In the end when legalization comes--and it will--there will still be folks looking to sell on the streetcorner or out of their apartments, and it will be much like moonshine:

    GOD*AMN REVENOOOOOORS!


    And what about people who sell to people under 21?
  • I don't get the argument.
    If you can grow pot for quality or grow it for lower cost, why would supporting the criminal overhead make it "better" than the store brands?

    /its like claiming moonshine is better than even the cheapest store bought whiskey.
    /it only seems that way if you have a taste for watered down rubbing alcohol.
  • My ex recently started dealing weed. At first she did it just to "cover the cost of her own weed" but then she ended up buying a scale, a gun, and expanding her customer base to acquantances of coworkers and friends.

    She has a professional job, too, so I have no idea why she's engaging in such risky behavior.
  • Isitoveryet: aren't they both getting it from the same grower?

    /spoiled here in southern CA, it's hard to find shiatty buds.


    This.

    I won't get my card as long as my dealer keeps supplying the super duper automatic for me. Why would I need to pay $20/g for the same thing I'm already getting at $10/g?

    The dispensaries are just for people who want to pay a premium for the edibles and oil.
  • Something tells me it's only a matter of time before you're all smoking Monsanto.
  • Isitoveryet: aren't they both getting it from the same grower?

    /spoiled here in southern CA, it's hard to find shiatty buds.


    The dispensaries out here only sell what I call "dorm weed," anybody who grows anything good is just doing it for themselves in small doses. NoCal is a little better but SoCal pot is really not that great. People are just buying a brand name at this point
  • Sorry, full legalization will never happen.

    The Mob opposes legalization because they know what I know: The same people who deal grass also handle heroin and cocaine, and they want to protect their market.

    Small--timers who do not handle any hard narcotics also know what I know: Take the illegal out of it, and prices collapse.

    Good example is Cambodia, where grass is 100% legal, and an ounce bag goes for $1 at the Phnom Penh airport---but that's the only place in town you can buy it. A bag of good weed would last me all week, but if I drink a beer---15 minutes later, I want another beer. You do the math.

    Then of course we have all these government parasites who make a full time living off it; you think those bastards would actually go out and get a job?
  • So will I still be able to get an oz of decent outdoor schwag for $100 when I don't feel like spending $400 for the boutique stuff?
  • Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: My ex recently started dealing weed. At first she did it just to "cover the cost of her own weed" but then she ended up buying a scale, a gun, and expanding her customer base to acquantances of coworkers and friends.

    She has a professional job, too, so I have no idea why she's engaging in such risky behavior.


    that is strange, she must be raking in the cash.
    It probably seems like easy money until the risk catches up with her.

    /a risk i don't care to take.
  • olddinosaur: Sorry, full legalization will never happen.

    The Mob opposes legalization because they know what I know: The same people who deal grass also handle heroin and cocaine, and they want to protect their market.

    Small--timers who do not handle any hard narcotics also know what I know: Take the illegal out of it, and prices collapse.

    Good example is Cambodia, where grass is 100% legal, and an ounce bag goes for $1 at the Phnom Penh airport---but that's the only place in town you can buy it. A bag of good weed would last me all week, but if I drink a beer---15 minutes later, I want another beer. You do the math.

    Then of course we have all these government parasites who make a full time living off it; you think those bastards would actually go out and get a job?


    "The Mob" and small-time pot dealers have zero influence on federal drug legislation.
  • Something rubs me the wrong way in this article. I'm have a VERY hard time believing that these were all legitimate dealers this author "interviewed". He conveniently made it impossible to verify any of his sources, and the whole thing came off reading like it was done by one of the producers of Reefer Madness.
  • What I get from my dealer is very high quality. Also cheaper than what dispensaries charge for lesser strains. Also, no taxes. So I'd probably still buy from him even if pot went legal.
  • Isitoveryet: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: My ex recently started dealing weed. At first she did it just to "cover the cost of her own weed" but then she ended up buying a scale, a gun, and expanding her customer base to acquantances of coworkers and friends.

    She has a professional job, too, so I have no idea why she's engaging in such risky behavior.

    that is strange, she must be raking in the cash.
    It probably seems like easy money until the risk catches up with her.

    /a risk i don't care to take.


    That's the thing! She isn't making hardly anything (relative to her job). She makes maybe a few hundred a week. If she gets pulled over for speeding when she's on her way to make a delivery, ugh... Just doesn't seem worth it.
  • Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: My ex recently started dealing weed. At first she did it just to "cover the cost of her own weed" but then she ended up buying a scale, a gun, and expanding her customer base to acquantances of coworkers and friends.

    She has a professional job, too, so I have no idea why she's engaging in such risky behavior.


    I remember a convo with a dealer once. He was talking about how he had just gotten robbed the night before. Guy held him up for all his cash and weed. He shrugged, meh, it's business. Eff that, you could have lost your life for a few hundred bucks. Another dealer was a severe dumbass who invited "clients" TO HIS HOUSE and showed them the safe and everything. Big surprise one day when he's calling up all his clients demanding to know which one broke into his room and took all his stuff. Come to think of it I don't know any dealers who had happy endings regarding that career choice.
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