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  • Dnrtfa

    The schools get extra funding for each student in AP classes, so they pack them in as much as they can.

    This is what happens when legislatue gives financial incentives for student "performance."
  • "I'm gonna go write myself a minivan."

    ~Wally
  • I was going to say "Texas", then I remembered there aren't enough smart kids in Texas to warrant an Advance Placement program. Then I saw the Florida tag and thought, "Hey, that makes sense."
  • Typical libtard reaction toward the dumb kids, so at least their *feelings* won't be hurt by being placed on the little bus.

    /dnra
  • We want more minorities in advanced placement classes!

    What do you mean, most of them didn't pass the tests? Make the tests easier!

    What in god's name is a jive turkey?

    / you can't expect AP classes to have the exact same ratio of minorites as the rest of your school
  • That's because AP is the new Honors
    'B's are the new 'D's
    PhDs are the new Masters Degree
    Going-to-college is the new getting-a-job-straight-out-of-high-sch ool
  • Most states do this, and none of them wonder why the kids don't do better. It's considered discriminatory to exclude kids who want to take the classes even if everyone knows going in he has no chance of passing the test. When I took these tests 16 and 17 years ago, my parents had to pay the test fees. I'm pretty sure they can't do that anymore either.
  • Maryland. Though, that don't just let them, they encourage them.
  • My school wouldn't let me take the AP classes because I was a "discipline problem." I sat for the exams anyway; I had to cover the fee from each one, then the school reimbursed me the money when I passed.
  • StrikitRich: Florida students' reading scores rank second in world


    Doesn't say which world.


    What Florida did was basically spend all their resources on the lowest performers. Now those same "lowest performers" are taking the AP classes.
  • NC has this problem as well, There's a magnet school in Raleigh that is supposed to have 80% high achievers and 20% local population, however the ratio is reversed yet they still get the funding. A buddy of mine teaches AP math there, he was told by admin that no one can fail the tests in his class and no one can come out of the class with less than a B for the year. He's got 5 classes a day full of kids who can barely do fractions and he's required to give them passing grades that they simply don't earn in Trig and Pre-calc or even Algebra.
  • New York.  I remember having a couple tards in my AP classes.  Made the rest of us feel better about ourselves.
  • So, subtard, since the kids aren't able to speak that means they aren't bright enough to be in an AP class?

    That is what you meant by, "dumb", right?
  • JWideman: StrikitRich: Florida students' reading scores rank second in world


    Doesn't say which world.

    What Florida did was basically spend all their resources on the lowest performers. Now those same "lowest performers" are taking the AP classes.


    So what you are saying is spending money on education works?
  • Wow, there is more talking out of the ass here than I usually see. Start with Subby - no, the state isn't wondering why they don't score higher on the tests, it is understood from the beginning that expanding enrollment to AP classes will lower the average score. I know, that doesn't make as funny a headline.
  • I tutor remedial-level math at a large, public comprehensive university. The students coming to us from high school are functionally illiterate in math. 60% of entering freshman need remedial math to start the college level curriculum - that's the national average and we meet it dead on. Our lowest level remedial math course starts at 6th grade math, and students are flunking it in record numbers. These are students who, no joke, need a calculator to multiply and divide and add or subtract more than 2 numbers.

    The majority of the problem doesn't lie in high schools. The problem starts much earlier than that. Students don't understand the fundamentals of math like arithmetic, fractions, and postive/negative numbers, so when they get to high school level work - Algebra, Geometry, Trig, and Precal - they are completely bewildered.
  • Mambo Bananapatch: I was going to say "Texas", then I remembered there aren't enough smart kids in Texas to warrant an Advance Placement program. Then I saw the Florida tag and thought, "Hey, that makes sense."


    Actually the idea comes out of a program from Texas. Laying the Foundation has tried to compete with College Board financially.

    Most states are seeing what FLA is seeing.
  • StrikitRich: JWideman: StrikitRich: Florida students' reading scores rank second in world


    Doesn't say which world.

    What Florida did was basically spend all their resources on the lowest performers. Now those same "lowest performers" are taking the AP classes.

    So what you are saying is spending money on education works?


    Nope. Those kids don't pass.
  • Macular Degenerate: I tutor remedial-level math at a large, public comprehensive university. The students coming to us from high school are functionally illiterate in math. 60% of entering freshman need remedial math to start the college level curriculum - that's the national average and we meet it dead on. Our lowest level remedial math course starts at 6th grade math, and students are flunking it in record numbers. These are students who, no joke, need a calculator to multiply and divide and add or subtract more than 2 numbers.

    The majority of the problem doesn't lie in high schools. The problem starts much earlier than that. Students don't understand the fundamentals of math like arithmetic, fractions, and postive/negative numbers, so when they get to high school level work - Algebra, Geometry, Trig, and Precal - they are completely bewildered.


    Problem lies with the push to get all students into college.
  • Macular Degenerate: I tutor remedial-level math at a large, public comprehensive university. The students coming to us from high school are functionally illiterate in math. 60% of entering freshman need remedial math to start the college level curriculum - that's the national average and we meet it dead on. Our lowest level remedial math course starts at 6th grade math, and students are flunking it in record numbers. These are students who, no joke, need a calculator to multiply and divide and add or subtract more than 2 numbers.

    The majority of the problem doesn't lie in high schools. The problem starts much earlier than that. Students don't understand the fundamentals of math like arithmetic, fractions, and postive/negative numbers, so when they get to high school level work - Algebra, Geometry, Trig, and Precal - they are completely bewildered.



    Math is treated as an obstacle by most students and most parents, even a lot of smart and successful parents, and they view the ability to do math without a calculator about the same way that most people regard navigation by stars and compass - a pointless exercise that isn't seen as relevant to anybody's life going back several generations. It doesn't help that pop culture depicts math as something you either magically "get" or you don't (Beautiful Mind, Good Will Hunting, etc).
  • CreamFilling: Most states do this, and none of them wonder why the kids don't do better. It's considered discriminatory to exclude kids who want to take the classes even if everyone knows going in he has no chance of passing the test. When I took these tests 16 and 17 years ago, my parents had to pay the test fees. I'm pretty sure they can't do that anymore either.


    There's that, and IIRC, I had to be "recommended" by teachers to be allowed to enroll in an AP class in the first place.

    / didn't take the AP Calculus I exam in 1986
    // I suck at math...
  • Wulfman: Math is treated as an obstacle by most students and most parents, even a lot of smart and successful parents, and they view the ability to do math without a calculator about the same way that most people regard navigation by stars and compass - a pointless exercise that isn't seen as relevant to anybody's life going back several generations. It doesn't help that pop culture depicts math as something you either magically "get" or you don't (Beautiful Mind, Good Will Hunting, etc).


    I cringe every time I hear grown adults say "oh I'm bad at math" and most people just agree that's a reasonable thing to be bad at. If someone said "I can't read very well" most people would suggest they enroll in a class or get some self-help materials because they'd realize illiteracy is a big problem that will affect someone's life greatly.
  • Wulfman:
    Math is treated as an obstacle by most students and most parents, even a lot of smart and successful parents, and they view the ability to do math without a calculator about the same way that most people regard navigation by stars and compass - a pointless exercise that isn't seen as relevant to anybody's life going back several generations.


    And they are right, math is fairly useless for the vast majority of people.
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