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  • www.examiner.comView Full Size


    You'd jail your sisters for refusing to submit to the demands of the wealthy and powerful? I'm impressed, officer.
  • Good grief.

    My fellow conspiratorialists: I love the idea that it is only healthy for one to distrust Big Money and Big Gummint, and believe you me I am sensitive to eavesdropping issues and the loss of our personal privacy. But this ain't it. Smart meters allow the power company to do two things:

    1. Collect your power bill without sending the meter reader out to your house. This is a tradeoff, from our standpoint, between meter reading jobs and the price of our utility service.

    2. It allows the utility to adjust the price in real time against the real time demand, thus allowing us to adjust our usage to make the best use of the energy we buy. Charge the electric car or do the laundry at night. Turn off the air conditioner if everyone is at school or work during the hottest part of the day. Use the energy when it is cheapest. A dumb power meter can't tell the difference, but a smart meter can.

    Another little issue is that the utility company really does own the meter and really can do whatever they please with it. Threatening a meter installer is just plain stoopid, and I don't care what your local fearmongers are selling. They aren't always right, as they aren't in this case. The low power RF needed to drive-by read your meter is not going to affect your little bear cubs. Also, if you quote Sarah Palin, you should go to jail in handcuffs.
  • This About That: 2. It allows the utility to adjust the price in real time against the real time demand,


    "Hey, we could have gotten .02 more a kilowatt hr. for that!" "Now we CAN! And tell the meter readers to stay home this year." Yay, progress. So, are these mandatory on commercial accounts, too?
  • bunner: So, are these mandatory on commercial accounts, too?


    I don't know for sure, but my guess would be that commercial accounts have higher energy requirements, especially during the daytime, and are less like to shoot a utility employee over RF emanations. So, yeah, probably.
  • This About That: and are less like to shoot a utility employee


    Who got shot?
  • This About That: Turn off the air conditioner if everyone is at school or work during the hottest part of the day.


    Our house is crazy old (152 years) and it was retrofitted with air-conditioning in 2002.  Since we couldn't run continuous duct work all over the house like you can in a new build, we have three zones and three heat pumps with programmable thermostats.  I made an uncomfortable discovery this summer - if we shut off the air conditioning for the zone that handles the upstairs bedrooms and the temperature goes above 97 that day - the heat pump can't cool down the upstairs overnight.  It tries, but it just can't do it.  The inside temperature upstairs creeps well above 115 even with an attic fan running.

    I tried fiddling with the time it was turned off, then I tried leaving it on but setting the temp absurdly high (85 degrees - the highest the thermostat will go), then I bumped it down, and bumped it down, and bumped it down again until we at last got to a point where the overnight temp could drop to at least 75.

    The biggest problem is that it's an old farmhouse, so the walls aren't insulated that well and the roof is black-tar painted tin.  I'm getting the roof painted with silver reflective paint this spring, so I hope that takes some of the heat load off the house.
  • Lsherm: The biggest problem is that it's an old farmhouse, so the walls aren't insulated that well and the roof is black-tar painted tin. I'm getting the roof painted with silver reflective paint this spring, so I hope that takes some of the heat load off the house.


    I'm a fan of big ol' farmhouses, but insulation didn't seem to be such a big priority back then. Have you investigated how long it would take to recoup the cost of insulation? Hint: Start with the attic.

    A whole-house extractor fan would help, too. The extractor pulls the hot air from the upstairs after it cools off outside after dark, and sends it into the attic to displace the even hotter air up there. Open windows downstairs and start it up after dark.
  • This About That: A whole-house extractor fan would help, too. The extractor pulls the hot air from the upstairs after it cools off outside after dark, and sends it into the attic to displace the even hotter air up there. Open windows downstairs and start it up after dark.


    Yeah, I have one in the attic above the bedrooms.  Once again, the problem is that it's an old farmhouse, so it was built in stages (whenever they needed more room, they just built another room) - so I have 4 attics.

    I'm torn about installing vents in the bedroom ceilings to pass air up to the attic to let the fan work better.  It would let the bedrooms cool off faster from the attic fan, but it would be a nightmare in the winter unless I closed them off tight.

    This About That: Have you investigated how long it would take to recoup the cost of insulation? Hint: Start with the attic.


    That's the thing - the attic above the bedrooms IS insulated.  It has blown insulation between the bedroom ceilings and the attic floor (it's a walk up attic) and rolled thin foil insulation on the floor.  The only other thing I can insulate is the clapboard roof the tin is nailed to, presumably with hard foam insulation, but I'm worried about doing that because it would make water leaks harder to find.  Also, since either end of the attic has a full size 4.5 foot window on it, I'm not sure if it would do any good.  Insulating the attic floor seemed like the best option at some point, and I'm inclined to agree with whoever made that decision.

    Here's a picture of the bedroom attic with an inspector and our real estate agent during a walkthrough.  You can see the blown insulation, the back of the tin from the roof, the floorboards, and you can barely make out a window behind the inspector.  The only thing we've added since this picture was taken was foil insulation on top of the floorboards, but it didn't seem to help much.

    img802.imageshack.usView Full Size


    I'm sure I'll work it out over the next 20 years or so.  What made the house tolerable when it was built - 19 million windows, works against it now.
  • People with the meters installed on their homes reported symptoms such as headaches, insomnia, tinnitus, and DNA breakdown.

    God, I hate that feeling. Do you have any idea how irritating that tingle is, ever time the phone rings? Chromosomal erosion sucks.
  • Nullav: People with the meters installed on their homes reported symptoms such as headaches, insomnia, tinnitus, and DNA breakdown.

    God, I hate that feeling. Do you have any idea how irritating that tingle is, ever time the phone rings? Chromosomal erosion sucks.


    "Doctor, doctor! I feel like i'm falling apart",
    "I see, must be the smart meter in your house causing your DNA to break down, surprisingly common, yes I can see your arm is turning into some kind of paste."

    No one's mentioned it yet, so let me ask. Since this is a Breitbart link how do we know that 1. it's not entirely fabricated, 2. if it's true it's not because the women attacked people?

    I'll admit that some of these smart meter installing practices seem a bit shady, but them I'm not fool enough to fail to recognise that all my sources on it are crazy nutjobs who have a vested interest in making their practices seem a bit shady.
  • Nullav: People with the meters installed on their homes reported symptoms such as headaches, insomnia, tinnitus, and DNA breakdown.

    God, I hate that feeling. Do you have any idea how irritating that tingle is, ever time the phone rings? Chromosomal erosion sucks.


    My thoughts exactly.

    I wonder what percentage of the people calling to complain about the "RF signals" being sent by the meter were using a cell or wireless phone.
  • mr_a: Nullav: People with the meters installed on their homes reported symptoms such as headaches, insomnia, tinnitus, and DNA breakdown.

    God, I hate that feeling. Do you have any idea how irritating that tingle is, ever time the phone rings? Chromosomal erosion sucks.

    My thoughts exactly.

    I wonder what percentage of the people calling to complain about the "RF signals" being sent by the meter were using a cell or wireless phone.


    I think it's because RF radiation has "radiation" in it.  They think it's like nuclear fallout of something.
  • Considering the source, am I right to assume that they left out some parts of this story and changed the context of it to suit their worldview?
  • vpb: mr_a: Nullav: People with the meters installed on their homes reported symptoms such as headaches, insomnia, tinnitus, and DNA breakdown.

    God, I hate that feeling. Do you have any idea how irritating that tingle is, ever time the phone rings? Chromosomal erosion sucks.

    My thoughts exactly.

    I wonder what percentage of the people calling to complain about the "RF signals" being sent by the meter were using a cell or wireless phone.

    I think it's because RF radiation has "radiation" in it.  They think it's like nuclear fallout of something.


    Wouldn't it be so much fun to tell them how much more radiation their wifi routers are TX.
  • And do they know that the electric company already keeps track of how much electricity they use?

    Or am I missing the point here.
  • 2. It allows the utility to adjust the price in real time against the real time demand, thus allowing us to adjust our usage to make the best use of the energy we buy. Charge the electric car or do the laundry at night. Turn off the air conditioner if everyone is at school or work during the hottest part of the day. Use the energy when it is cheapest. A dumb power meter can't tell the difference, but a smart meter can.


    How do they know if there is nobody in the house? I work from home some days. And what about my dogs? Why should they suffer in the heat?
  • Solution. Solar panels.
    Insulated bolt cutters.
  • <b><a href="http://www.fark.com/comments/755 8700/82146714#c82146714" target="_blank">vpb</a>:</b> <i>mr_a: Nullav: People with the meters installed on their homes reported symptoms such as headaches, insomnia, tinnitus, and DNA breakdown.

    God, I hate that feeling. Do you have any idea how irritating that tingle is, ever time the phone rings? Chromosomal erosion sucks.

    My thoughts exactly.

    I wonder what percentage of the people calling to complain about the "RF signals" being sent by the meter were using a cell or wireless phone.

    I think it's because RF radiation has "radiation" in it.  They think it's like nuclear fallout of something.</i>

    Same reason the 'N' in 'NMRI' is often not mentioned.
  • Of course this is from brietfart so anything from it should be taken with 2 grains of salt.
    I mean, the site has a tab labeled "Big Peace". What the hell does that even mean?
  • Arresting two people for not having the smart meters is definitely overkill on behalf of the police. Why the two didn't go with the manual meters is beyond me.

    I do love how the article points out the meters are "controversial" at least twice. Also, the the stuff about people complaining about "DNA damage" due to the meters is a bit amusing. The other stuff I could understand, but how would you even determine something like that? Send a swab to a lab or something?

    Lastly, I have the feeling that Breitbart's team is reporting this because it fits in so well with the "fight big government" thrust of the site, not to mention it's in Chicago.
  • mrlewish: Solution. Solar panels.
    Insulated bolt cutters.


    Actually...

    media.thereadystore.comView Full Size

    Seriously, put it around the meter.
  • I hope that subby is posting this so that we can mock it and not because he actually believes this crap.
  • This sounds like a brave thing to do in Naperville. Regardless of her motives, the gossip around the neighborhood will be that Jenny can't afford the 25 bucks a month to opt out.
  • Richard C Stanford: Of course this is from brietfart so anything from it should be taken with 2 grains of salt.
    I mean, the site has a tab labeled "Big Peace". What the hell does that even mean?


    The peace-industrial complex is notorious for hugging its enemies to death. They're not to be trifled with. Look at Brietblart: he dared to speak truth to their power, and they hugged him to death with cocaine.
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