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  • If you're a food supplier, that's a feature, not a bug.
  • Actually the fact we have competing mega-grocery stores across the street from each other is a bigger factor, subs.
  • So, Trump voters.
  • My rule is if it smells bad or has visible mold growing on it I throw it away. Except for cheese, that is. Cheese just gets the mold cut off unless it's penetrated too deep.
  • Where I come from we've got a little rule: if it's brown, drink it down. If it's black, send it back.
  • Maybe we can just change to an "Eat this shiat by" date?
  • I've eaten stuff that was 10+ years past the expiration date. As long as it's non meat or dairy, and doesn't require refrigeration, it's no big deal as long as the original seal is still intact. Canned soup, vegetables, peanut butter, pickles, dry pancake mix etc. It's all good.
  • All I know is that I've used eggs two months after their BB date, and tofu three months after, safely.

    Maybe the food safety standards here are better, maybe I have an iron stomach.
  • The last time I read Consumerist, that website appeared to have been long pass it's "use by" date,
  • CSB:
    There are various charities and causes that like the hang out in front of the nearby small grocery store, which happens to be near an Albertson's. One night as I head in and out of the grocery, there's a small team of high schoolers collecting canned food for some cause. As I pulled away and drove behind the Albertson's, I see a semi from a local food bank loading up with crates and crates of fruit (I could tell because of the bannana boxes.) Good on Albertson's (at least at the local level) for selling or donating produce, it's worth several times what typically comes in a can or box.
  • aagrajag: All I know is that I've used eggs two months after their BB date, and tofu three months after, safely.

    Maybe the food safety standards here are better, maybe I have an iron stomach.


    Sounds like you are one of those who don't understand what a best before date means.
  • Who even reads that sheet?
  • Sounds more like an "understanding English" problem.  Why would the words "sell-by" mean that it expires on that date?  It would mean that you could risk buying just-turned food.  Even "use by" is more of a guess or average than an actual date of spoiling; one would assume that "sell-by" has some extra time factored into it to account for actually using the product.

    "Best if used by" seems pretty obvious too:  it won't be at its best if you eat it after the specified date.  Not the same thing as spoiled.

    I suspect it has something to do with people being a little overzealous about taking the better-safe-than-sorry approach.
  • LiberalConservative: aagrajag: All I know is that I've used eggs two months after their BB date, and tofu three months after, safely.

    Maybe the food safety standards here are better, maybe I have an iron stomach.

    Sounds like you are one of those who don't understand what a best before date means.


    No need to be snippy, I know perfectly what it means.

    I was also unable to detect any change in flavour or texture. I could have purchased them the previous day.
  • Jirafa: Sounds more like an "understanding English" problem.  Why would the words "sell-by" mean that it expires on that date?  It would mean that you could risk buying just-turned food.  Even "use by" is more of a guess or average than an actual date of spoiling; one would assume that "sell-by" has some extra time factored into it to account for actually using the product.

    "Best if used by" seems pretty obvious too:  it won't be at its best if you eat it after the specified date.  Not the same thing as spoiled.

    I suspect it has something to do with people being a little overzealous about taking the better-safe-than-sorry approach.


    I think that part of the problem is that many people cynically assume -- not without reason -- that "Best before" is corporate-speak for "eat before this date or suffer rectal-prolapse-inducing projectile diarhhea."
  • I eat plenty of stuff past its best before date. Usually it makes little to no noticeable difference to the taste providing we're talking months not years. The clearance shelf in places like Tesco often slashes the prices on items close to the best before date which is great.
    <p>
    Use by means use by. Food poisoning sucks.
  • Jirafa: Sounds more like an "understanding English" problem.  Why would the words "sell-by" mean that it expires on that date?  It would mean that you could risk buying just-turned food.  Even "use by" is more of a guess or average than an actual date of spoiling; one would assume that "sell-by" has some extra time factored into it to account for actually using the product.

    "Best if used by" seems pretty obvious too:  it won't be at its best if you eat it after the specified date.  Not the same thing as spoiled.

    I suspect it has something to do with people being a little overzealous about taking the better-safe-than-sorry approach.


    I guess you've never had a parent or SO say "does anyone want this (whatever), because if not I'm going to throw it away."
  • This discussion takes place in my house once a week. My wife is susepible to authoritIan claims.
  • fusillade762: My rule is if it smells bad or has visible mold growing on it I throw it away. Except for cheese, that is. Cheese just gets the mold cut off unless it's penetrated too deep.


    And some cheese you don't even need to cut the mould off.
    www.countrybrewer.com.auView Full Size
  • aagrajag: LiberalConservative: aagrajag: All I know is that I've used eggs two months after their BB date, and tofu three months after, safely.

    Maybe the food safety standards here are better, maybe I have an iron stomach.

    Sounds like you are one of those who don't understand what a best before date means.

    No need to be snippy, I know perfectly what it means.

    I was also unable to detect any change in flavour or texture. I could have purchased them the previous day.


    No snippy intended. See your bolded text above. Exceeding best before is not a health risk (within reason). If you understood that you wouldn't be questioning safety standards or your iron stomach ability.
  • fusillade762: My rule is if it smells bad or has visible mold growing on it I throw it away. Except for cheese, that is. Cheese just gets the mold cut off unless it's penetrated too deep.


    I used to do that. Just last month, I made some pasta with some milk that was three days old. It smelled okay, hell, even tasted okay. I eat vegetarian, so the dish was the pasta, some (frozen) veggies, cheese (fresh), and just a bit of 'old' milk.

    Spent the rest of the night vomiting everything I'd ever eaten that was still in my system, cleaned my guts of bile and bacteria, and then dry-retched until I was ready to come to Jesus.

    My cat was so inspired, she even came in to sympathy puke next to me, just to show her enthusiastic support. It was a night I won't forget.

    I follow 'best by' dates now. Religiously.
  • Can we just take a step back and ask what, if anything, does the average consumer understand?
  • If you open it you have to chug it.

    Rules.
  • aagrajag: All I know is that I've used eggs two months after their BB date, and tofu three months after, safely.


    The secret is to put your dairy in the very back of the fridge. It's coldest back there and milk and eggs can last weeks beyond their expiry dates. Sometimes they'll even get some light frost.
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