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  • Why would you take a digital pill to your doctor?
  •  
    Bipolar people are notorious for not taking medicine.
  • Nothing could go wrong with this idea, ever.
  • If it's a blue pill, they already know.
  • Care plan compliance is actually one of the greatest determiners of patient outcomes.
  • Enigmamf: Care plan compliance is actually one of the greatest determiners of patient outcomes.


    Yep.  And lots of older patients could benefit from smarter pills.
  • medicalfuturist.comView Full Size


    been there, done that.
  • colinspooky: Why would you take a digital pill to your doctor?

    Oh, no, don't go starting that digital pill vs. analog pill thing again, Martha.
  • Are they going to offer digital methadone also?
  • That's brilliant and terrible. Patients never take their meds on time.
    Privacy is obsolete.

    /in THX 1138 he was arrested for "Drug Evasion" right?
  • Uh, any doctor, anywhere, would kill for something like this, if it was reliable and cheap.

    Patient goes to doc, doc prescribes medicine, two weeks later patient is back, still sick.
    a) meds aren't working, maybe diagnosis is wrong
    b) meds aren't sufficient, try a larger dose
    c) patient forgot to take meds all week, give them a good scolding and/or sign them up for some kind of reminder service
    d) patient sold the drugs on the black market

    This is a big deal for elderly patients, who take lots of meds and often forget what they're supposed to take.

    Trying this in schizophrenics and bipolar people is also a very good idea.  From time to time they'll decide to stop taking their meds, and won't tell anybody.  It can take a few weeks for the symptoms to be obvious, and by that point things tend to get bad - they won't listen to anybody, so the only "treatment" is to wait until they're a clear danger to themselves or others and can be locked up involuntarily, at great expense.  Meanwhile the patient will have completely trashed his career and relationships and may need years to get back to a position of relative self-sufficiency.
      However, it might not work.  This population includes some clever and paranoid people.  Getting the pill to report that it's been swallowed can't be too difficult.
  • vpb: Bipolar people are notorious for not taking medicine.


    They're not the only ones. People don't take their medicine for a number of reasons: financial, distaste for side effects, or even 'intelligent nonadherence' (i.e. the patient figuring out that the medicine does more harm than good for them, specifically).
  • I worked for Proteus a couple of years ago. For Alzheimers and clinical trial patients, this product is a blessing. I'm still concerned about privacy implications for other use cases.
  • Hey doc.  Harry just took his Abilify.  Yep.  I'm down here in his gut.  Looking around.  You know how Harry said he was managing his diabetes by limiting his sugar intake?  Yeah.  I'm not seeing that down here, doc.  There's the remains of two donuts and a chocolate bar.  That's the fresh stuff.  I'm sitting on a bunch of fried potatoes.  That should be in his diet either, know what I mean?

    Be sure to tell Harry about the ulcer from his drinking.  Look like a big red star gate ready to pop.  Well, looks like I'm heading in to the intestines, or polyptown as I call 'em.  I'll call you again when I hit the toilet.  Abilify out.
  • We left 1984. What's wrong?
    2004 - THX 1138 - Re-Released Trailer - Whats Wrong - George Lucas
    Youtube I0olK2qyoVAView Full Size
  • I think telling someone with schizophrenia that there is a small monitoring device in their medicine is a great way to get them to take it.
    Smartest (10)   Funniest (38)  
  • brainlordmesomorph: That's brilliant and terrible. Patients never take their meds on time.
    Privacy is obsolete.


    The makers of one of my cardiac meds used to send me emails when they thought I hadn't refilled my script in a timely fashion.  Creepy.  I told them to fark off and stop bothering me.
  • How can I make a pill that cost $0.17 instead cost $20? We can put a computer in it!? Great.
  • I know of a camera pill, so assess GI Tract. Probably grossest movie ever.
  • So let's say you have a brother who suffers from schizophrenia/bipolar disorder.  He's lost his job/family/everything he owns in the last few years because, on occasion, he stop taking his medication regularly.  You let him stay in the spare bedroom because you don't want him to be homeless on the streets, but you're concerned he could stop taking his medication again.  He's completely fine 99% of the time when he is taking it, but even still when that 1% happens (as it inevitably does) and he stops taking the pills he spirals out of control.  You now have a way to know whether or not he is taking the meds like he's supposed to.  If he misses one you know immediately, rather than finding out days/weeks down the road when he's far gone enough that it's now a crisis situation.  You have the opportunity, while he can still be reasoned with, to get him to resume his medication.

    Is this a bad thing?
  • I could actually use something like this.  A lot of my medications are very time dependent, and despite several alarms on my phone and using a pharmacy that breaks my prescriptions up by the day and hour I often miss doses.  This is part general forgetfulness and part of the disease I'm struggling with.

    The privacy risks can't be casually dismissed however.
  • Harry Freakstorm: Hey doc.  Harry just took his Abilify.  Yep.  I'm down here in his gut.  Looking around.  You know how Harry said he was managing his diabetes by limiting his sugar intake?  Yeah.  I'm not seeing that down here, doc.  There's the remains of two donuts and a chocolate bar.  That's the fresh stuff.  I'm sitting on a bunch of fried potatoes.  That should be in his diet either, know what I mean?

    Be sure to tell Harry about the ulcer from his drinking.  Look like a big red star gate ready to pop.  Well, looks like I'm heading in to the intestines, or polyptown as I call 'em.  I'll call you again when I hit the toilet.  Abilify out.


    First thing I thought of, too.  Now we will crap electronics.
  • which then transmits the information to a mobile application so that patients can track the ingestion of the medication on their smartphone.

    Of course it does. There's always a smartphone app in the plan somewhere.
  • nartreb: Uh, any doctor, anywhere, would kill for something like this, if it was reliable and cheap.

    Patient goes to doc, doc prescribes medicine, two weeks later patient is back, still sick.
    a) meds aren't working, maybe diagnosis is wrong
    b) meds aren't sufficient, try a larger dose
    c) patient forgot to take meds all week, give them a good scolding and/or sign them up for some kind of reminder service
    d) patient sold the drugs on the black market

    This is a big deal for elderly patients, who take lots of meds and often forget what they're supposed to take.

    Trying this in schizophrenics and bipolar people is also a very good idea.  From time to time they'll decide to stop taking their meds, and won't tell anybody.  It can take a few weeks for the symptoms to be obvious, and by that point things tend to get bad - they won't listen to anybody, so the only "treatment" is to wait until they're a clear danger to themselves or others and can be locked up involuntarily, at great expense.  Meanwhile the patient will have completely trashed his career and relationships and may need years to get back to a position of relative self-sufficiency.
      However, it might not work.  This population includes some clever and paranoid people.  Getting the pill to report that it's been swallowed can't be too difficult.


    FTA: About the size of a grain of salt, the sensor has no battery or antenna and is activated when it gets wet from stomach juices. That completes a circuit between coatings of copper and magnesium on either side, generating a tiny electric charge.

    Sounds like you could crush it and drop in lemon juice vinegar. If they wanted to sell or take a bunch of pills at once (if it were opiates), they could boil it off and collect the residue.
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