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  • Cool. Now that was something bothering me. Of I had a house with a pool I'd install a system to water down the house...
    Does anyone make those for California?
  • I, for one, am surprised that no one has come up with a cheap spray on retardant that someone could apply on their own.  Usually it is the large number of sparks that set a house on fire.  Be nice if you could just spray something on your home that would act as an insulator against the sparks.  Sure, it would cost some money to clean it off and there is no guarantee it would work but if I lived in such an area I would probably spend a few thousand dollars on something like this on the off chance that it did work.

    Of, if you want to go impractical, giant metal domes that will fit right over your house!  Start up a company and just stack them on top of each other.  Fire approaching?  Fire up the surplus Chinook helicopter and fly one of these to someone's house and set down over it.  There you go, the answer to this problem!  ;-)
  • So, be gentle with me if this sounds stupid.  But if you wanted to build a home in a potential wildfire area like this, would it help to add to the house during construction, the equivalent of a giant sprinkler head on the top of your roof- a system to wet the house and walls down?  I suppose if everybody had that, they'd bring down the water pressure too low and everything would burn.   What about a very large sort of tarp of mylar or some non-flammable material, that can be deployed over the home to defend against the hot embers and so forth? That's assuming of course all the other typical fire defenses  - clearing brush away from the perimeter, and using non-flammable materials like concrete, slate, mineral fabric, metal, etc.  are also already in practice.

    If I was going to build something in a fire-prone area, it would be all concrete and steel, perhaps earth-sheltered, semi-underground, or at least rammed earth and adobe above ground, with some kind of retention pond for ground water nearby. Not wooden balloon-framed crackerbox construction, with brush and trees right up to the doors and windows..

    of course the best answer would be; "don't build there, idiot", I know.  But I find the design challenge interesting.
  • rooftop235: Cool. Now that was something bothering me. Of I had a house with a pool I'd install a system to water down the house...
    Does anyone make those for California?


    from what I have read about these fires the pool would prob boil you, and the measly spray would be useless, so I would grab your stash and bail when you can
    img.fark.netView Full Size
  • weirdneighbour: rooftop235: Cool. Now that was something bothering me. Of I had a house with a pool I'd install a system to water down the house...
    Does anyone make those for California?

    from what I have read about these fires the pool would prob boil you, and the measly spray would be useless, so I would grab your stash and bail when you can
    [img.fark.net image 850x415]


    Here in FL when we had the wildfires some folks put lawn sprinklers on their roofs and it helped save the whole house.
  • Any Pie Left: So, be gentle with me if this sounds stupid.  But if you wanted to build a home in a potential wildfire area like this, would it help to add to the house during construction, the equivalent of a giant sprinkler head on the top of your roof- a system to wet the house and walls down?  I suppose if everybody had that, they'd bring down the water pressure too low and everything would burn.   What about a very large sort of tarp of mylar or some non-flammable material, that can be deployed over the home to defend against the hot embers and so forth? That's assuming of course all the other typical fire defenses  - clearing brush away from the perimeter, and using non-flammable materials like concrete, slate, mineral fabric, metal, etc.  are also already in practice.

    If I was going to build something in a fire-prone area, it would be all concrete and steel, perhaps earth-sheltered, semi-underground, or at least rammed earth and adobe above ground, with some kind of retention pond for ground water nearby. Not wooden balloon-framed crackerbox construction, with brush and trees right up to the doors and windows..

    of course the best answer would be; "don't build there, idiot", I know.  But I find the design challenge interesting.


    There are some sprinkler systems available - a sort of external upside-down version of internal fire sprinklers. Your point about feeding them from the mains and the loss of pressure/flow when everyone turns them on at the same time, is valid. You could feed them from your swimming pool, or have a rainwater capture tank/s for use in these emergencies - both of those require pumps and power, of course.

    I'm in a timber house surrounded by eucalypt forest - those are the trees that explode when they get really hot. The solution is to have a plan, and a contingency plan, and a backup plan.

    Plan - at least 10 metres of tree-free zone around the house, or fire resistant trees, regularly clear the roof gutters, petrol for the generator to run the water pump, and adequate water. If any part of this plan fails, transfer to:

    Contingency plan - now is the time to decide whether to stay and fight, or flee. In either case, the children will be given 15 minutes to pack precious stuff, then they'll be driven away from the fire to a clear area or a refuge. Those staying will be given 15 minutes to pack precious stuff which will go with the kids, then we get stuck into cutting down and clearing potential fire hazards, getting water onto the roof (I don't have a sprinkler system, just hoses), and listening for reports from emergency services.

    Backup plan - make sure all personnel are accounted for, gather essentials, jump in the cars and flee.
  • It sounds like a great idea until they are surrounded by the fire and the water pressure drops and they can't water their houses down.

    At the end of the day what they're risking their lives for is just stuff.
  • I'll just add this:

    https://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/pub​l​ic-safety-and-emergency-services/emerg​ency-preparedness-response-recovery/em​bc/preparedbc/homeowner-firesmart.pdf

       Something I reiterate in any of these threads that pretty much all the damage to structures is easily preventable. The Fort McMurray fire investigation revealed that 81% of the Fire Smart compliant homes were undamaged. The one's that were lost were likely due to others lack of compliance or the community's lack of interface maintenance. The forests need to burn, our homes and communities don't.
  • rooftop235: weirdneighbour: rooftop235: Cool. Now that was something bothering me. Of I had a house with a pool I'd install a system to water down the house...
    Does anyone make those for California?

    from what I have read about these fires the pool would prob boil you, and the measly spray would be useless, so I would grab your stash and bail when you can
    [img.fark.net image 850x415]

    Here in FL when we had the wildfires some folks put lawn sprinklers on their roofs and it helped save the whole house.


    Then that proves I have no idea what the hell I am talking about, being thousands of miles to the nearest fire...there will be deaths, crap...where are those huge 'water droppers' planes I see on the forest fire movie clips?  I guess different then just forest fires.
  • Mock26: I, for one, am surprised that no one has come up with a cheap spray on retardant that someone could apply on their own.  Usually it is the large number of sparks that set a house on fire.  Be nice if you could just spray something on your home that would act as an insulator against the sparks.  Sure, it would cost some money to clean it off and there is no guarantee it would work but if I lived in such an area I would probably spend a few thousand dollars on something like this on the off chance that it did work.

    Of, if you want to go impractical, giant metal domes that will fit right over your house!  Start up a company and just stack them on top of each other.  Fire approaching?  Fire up the surplus Chinook helicopter and fly one of these to someone's house and set down over it.  There you go, the answer to this problem!  ;-)


    They have, Barricade II fire gel is USFS listed and costs under $500 for 4 gallons which is enough to cover 2k SQ feet. If I lived in fire country I'd have some and a gas powered pump or generator plus electric pump plus 400 gallons of rainwater storage or a pool (dilution is 100:1)
  • weirdneighbour: rooftop235: weirdneighbour: rooftop235: Cool. Now that was something bothering me. Of I had a house with a pool I'd install a system to water down the house...
    Does anyone make those for California?

    from what I have read about these fires the pool would prob boil you, and the measly spray would be useless, so I would grab your stash and bail when you can
    [img.fark.net image 850x415]

    Here in FL when we had the wildfires some folks put lawn sprinklers on their roofs and it helped save the whole house.

    Then that proves I have no idea what the hell I am talking about, being thousands of miles to the nearest fire...there will be deaths, crap...where are those huge 'water droppers' planes I see on the forest fire movie clips?  I guess different then just forest fires.


    I'm sure they are there, but with super dry kindling and the Santa Anna winds the chances of knocking down the flames and no Sparks restarting the fire are pretty close to zero. You need the winds to die down and ideally a heavy fog to roll in to have a decent chance at containment.
  • robodog: weirdneighbour: rooftop235: weirdneighbour: rooftop235: Cool. Now that was something bothering me. Of I had a house with a pool I'd install a system to water down the house...
    Does anyone make those for California?

    from what I have read about these fires the pool would prob boil you, and the measly spray would be useless, so I would grab your stash and bail when you can
    [img.fark.net image 850x415]

    Here in FL when we had the wildfires some folks put lawn sprinklers on their roofs and it helped save the whole house.

    Then that proves I have no idea what the hell I am talking about, being thousands of miles to the nearest fire...there will be deaths, crap...where are those huge 'water droppers' planes I see on the forest fire movie clips?  I guess different then just forest fires.

    I'm sure they are there, but with super dry kindling and the Santa Anna winds the chances of knocking down the flames and no Sparks restarting the fire are pretty close to zero. You need the winds to die down and ideally a heavy fog to roll in to have a decent chance at containment.


    You are invited to my next BBQ
  • Sometimes measures spoken above do work, and should not be discounted.  Up here in northern California I heard reports of the fires getting up to 4000F, others reporting around 2400F.  Either way, there is little that can be done about those temperature, as many building materials flash point are way under those temperature.  Now fighting embers is another story.  Good old garden hose and other measures are a great an useful options.
  • It's also apparently possible for embers to get in houses through vents and to set the house off that way.  keeping the roof wet might not be enough
  • robodog: Mock26: I, for one, am surprised that no one has come up with a cheap spray on retardant that someone could apply on their own.  Usually it is the large number of sparks that set a house on fire.  Be nice if you could just spray something on your home that would act as an insulator against the sparks.  Sure, it would cost some money to clean it off and there is no guarantee it would work but if I lived in such an area I would probably spend a few thousand dollars on something like this on the off chance that it did work.

    Of, if you want to go impractical, giant metal domes that will fit right over your house!  Start up a company and just stack them on top of each other.  Fire approaching?  Fire up the surplus Chinook helicopter and fly one of these to someone's house and set down over it.  There you go, the answer to this problem!  ;-)

    They have, Barricade II fire gel is USFS listed and costs under $500 for 4 gallons which is enough to cover 2k SQ feet. If I lived in fire country I'd have some and a gas powered pump or generator plus electric pump plus 400 gallons of rainwater storage or a pool (dilution is 100:1)


    Those thieving bastards, they stole my idea!
  • rooftop235: Cool. Now that was something bothering me. Of I had a house with a pool I'd install a system to water down the house...
    Does anyone make those for California?


    Folks I know in South Australia in the hills have special systems where they have their own water tanks with pumps and sprinklers. Code requires it. The tanks are about 22,000 liters, or over 5000 gallons if that works for you. The challenge is the pumps in case of a power outage. The solution is a gas or diesel pumps of at least 5hp. That can basically empty that tank in between 20 and 30 minutes. If you're lucky, you've got a well bore and can be refilling your tank but seldom at speeds comparable to how fast you empty it through your fire sprinklers. In a very fast moving fire, that can save you the first assault. However, your tank is what the fire crews would use to help you once they arrive so you rather have to hope that you've done enough to withstand the fire as it burns past you.
  • Mock26: I, for one, am surprised that no one has come up with a cheap spray on retardant that someone could apply on their own.  Usually it is the large number of sparks that set a house on fire.  Be nice if you could just spray something on your home that would act as an insulator against the sparks.  Sure, it would cost some money to clean it off and there is no guarantee it would work but if I lived in such an area I would probably spend a few thousand dollars on something like this on the off chance that it did work.

    Of, if you want to go impractical, giant metal domes that will fit right over your house!  Start up a company and just stack them on top of each other.  Fire approaching?  Fire up the surplus Chinook helicopter and fly one of these to someone's house and set down over it.  There you go, the answer to this problem!  ;-)


    But the fire is in CA, the self applied fire retardant would need to be ultra environmentally friendly and you would have to post a notice 30 days before use, and get clearance from 3 different levels of government.  Hell, the state is probably going to sue the pants off the people in the article for not just waiting for the authorities to take care of the houses.  "The citizens are not bonded and insured fire fighters!"
  • Krieghund: It's also apparently possible for embers to get in houses through vents and to set the house off that way.  keeping the roof wet might not be enough


    My brother-in-law was there on Poli street specifically watching his eaves. You have vents under your eaves and a vent on top at the ridge line in many homes. They are intended to draft air up and out. It's good for dissipating heat from the sun on your roof. It's bad when embers are in the wind that is drafting over the house with an effect like a venturi valve or chimney. Modern fire codes are beginning to require that the venting under the eaves have screens that can impede the intrusion of embers.

    I have no idea about this product but it's an example
    http://www.primosupply.com/Vulcan-Fla​m​e-Ember-Resistant-Vents/departments/11​9/
  • Any Pie Left: But if you wanted to build a home in a potential wildfire area like this, would it help to add to the house during construction, the equivalent of a giant sprinkler head on the top of your roof- a system to wet the house and walls down?

    It would mostly be overkill for small fires.

    1) Assuming that the outside of your house is already built out of fire-resistant materials ... asphalt shingles or clay tiles for roofing (vs wood shingles), stucco/aluminum/brick walls (vs vinyl or or wood slats).

    2) Assuming you've already taken appropriate fire precautions (keeping a clearing around the house, removing treefall (leaves, pine needles, etc) from the roof and gutters).

    And not very effective for large fires, your roof sprinkler thing is going to be effective against this.


    img.fark.netView Full Size


    - screenshot from that news video...


    It takes firefighters with big hoses a decent amount of time to fight these, residential water service doesn't stand a chance (it's just going to steam off).

    ol' gormsby: those are the trees that explode when they get really hot


    They are essentially trees filled with flammable oils. The should have never been planted in California (they got brought over from Australia during the gold rush).

    You haven't seen a forest fire unless you've seen a eucalyptus forest fire...

    ichef-1.bbci.co.ukView Full Size

    // they also fall over or drop branches during a storm
  • Ugh... My mom's family is from Ventura, I used to spend a lot of time at one of my aunt's houses on Poli. I used to help my cousin with his paper route in that neighborhood. I want to go up there after they put this thing out, but I'm a bit worried about what I'll find :-/
  • Dumbass tag was busy?

    They got really lucky.
  • lordargent: eucalyptus forest fire


    eucalyptus fires smell nice.  :)
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