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  • Yeah, no prosecutor would want to be known as the guy who charged an angry father & face a slam dunk jury nullification.
  • This guy is a real hero. It's too bad the cops rushed in so quickly to stop him. They should have let him get a few punches in. That man has three daughters who went to see Nassar.
  • Didn't the judge say this about a day afterwards anyway?
  • Prosecutors won't charge man who charged defendant?
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  • browneye: Didn't the judge say this about a day afterwards anyway?


    That was just regarding contempt charges.
  • In before the "But all violence is bad violence, unless they're brown and Muslim" Brigade.
  • The prosecutor is smart enough to realize a public lynching is entirely possible if he tried to put the father in jail.
  • OgreMagi: The prosecutor is smart enough to realize a public lynching is entirely possible if he tried to put the father in jail.


    A smart prosecutor will let Nassar have an unguarded day in the park, for a proper lynching.  Thousands watch, videos recorded, yet no one seems to know who did it.
  • He should face charges.  His behavior cheapens the Rule of Law.
    All charges should be dismissed of course.
  • OgreMagi: The prosecutor is smart enough to realize a public lynching is entirely possible if he tried to put the father in jail.


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  • Old Man Winter: He should face charges.  His behavior cheapens the Rule of Law.
    All charges should be dismissed of course.


    If only he'd had a batman mask, he'd be the perfect vigilante.
  • I am going to be the bad guy here, I guess:

    There is a reason we have courts of law, and there are reasons why there are very restrictive laws on behavior, which are to be followed in said courts. Literally, the courtroom should be the FURTHEST place from "vigilante justice" one may find.

    Things like this? I mean, sure, nobody was hurt today (but the odds are when something like this happens, the injured parties are FAR more likely to be a) the attacker and/or b) employees of the state doing their jobs to protect the criminal). And that's assuming no weapons are involved...

    I mean, where is the line? I'd have "not been unhappy" if someone filled Larry full of holes and/or objects at some point... but that doesn't mean that this kind of behavior should be acceptable.
  • Old Man Winter: He should face charges.  His behavior cheapens the Rule of Law.
    All charges should be dismissed of course.


    If a jury found him "not guilty" or a technicality deemed him temporarily insane, or any of that took place, I'd be happy.

    But, as you say, he should "face" charges. If this had been anywhere OTHER than a courtroom? I may be a bit more lax...
  • Two wrongs doesn't make one right.
  • I doubt any jury would convict him, although I think you're only eligible for a jury trial if you're facing at least 6 months in jail.
  • That video got to me.

    I know why we have the rule of law, and they stopped him for a reason, and they should have stopped him.

    I'm an easygoing sort; very little truly offends me, and I'm usually willing to forgive a wrong.

    But I have two young nephews, and if I were to face their abuser like that, you would have to stop me from killing him or her with my bare hands.
  • There is probably a reasonable middle ground between "no charges at all for what was effectively an assassination attempt in a courtroom" and "throw the book at Papa Wolf." I say charge him with disturbing the peace and fine him one dollar, and then immediately suspend the fine on the condition that he goes a whole week without murdering anyone, including Nassar.
  • FlyingBacon: Two wrongs doesn't make one right.


    But it's not 1+1=2; it's an unknown but known-to-be-huge +1, not even a noticeable difference with any reasonable precision.
  • King Something: There is probably a reasonable middle ground between "no charges at all for what was effectively an assassination attempt in a courtroom" and "throw the book at Papa Wolf." I say charge him with disturbing the peace and fine him one dollar, and then immediately suspend the fine on the condition that he goes a whole week without murdering anyone, including Nassar.


    Everyone involved seems to want it to just go away, so I'm fine with it just going away.
  • Frankly, the whole "victims impact statements" is wrong.

    I actually watched some of them from the earlier trial. Extremely poignant, in a large part because the victims in this case are remarkably well educated and poised individuals who have a history of performing under extremely high pressure situations. Those things add up to a strong ability to communicate the impact on them.

    What about victims from other backgrounds? Ones who haven't have therapy to help them cope with the impacts on them, who lack that education to express themselves as clearly, who lack the stage presence to deliver their message? Why would we allow such capricious differences in victims affect sentencing?

    It's not about justice, it's about vengeance. Sure people want vengeance but it's called a justice system. Civilization is supposed to forgo vengeance for justice. These extreme cases try that concept but that's why you don't want to decide based on the extreme cases.
  • to be fair, Nassar called him out right before he lunged.

    Tombstone - Johnny Ringo 'Alright lunger let's do it'
    Youtube ab57xD0oBz8
  • The stage is set for real change in the arena of protecting children from these predators. Nassar, Sandusky, every three card Monty priest shuffled from one parish to another and every frisky uncle are only a small part of the problem. Until society decides to stop willful ignorance that sexual abuse is a frequent, pernicious threat to the mental health of a ridiculously large segment of society the stories will continue. Over and over, the cycle repeats.  Clearly this isn't the work of few bad actors but a societal construct that allows trust to be given to those who shouldn't have it.

    I want to know why such a man was allowed to operate so brazenly and publicly for so long without being found out? When did people start worrying about the potential lawsuits instead of knowing that another child was sentenced to the dark hole of shame from being abused and taking action?

    In the cases of these Olympians, I can only hope they know that we are with them. Particularly because I don't like when anyone messes with my heroes.
  • King Something: There is probably a reasonable middle ground between "no charges at all for what was effectively an assassination attempt in a courtroom" and "throw the book at Papa Wolf." I say charge him with disturbing the peace and fine him one dollar, and then immediately suspend the fine on the condition that he goes a whole week without murdering anyone, including Nassar.


    Don't you first have to be important for it to be an assassination?
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