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    "The Stolen Madam *was* the inventory,  Inspector. It is a rare heirloom from the Red Light District, given by Edward VII when he was Prince of Wales."
  • they didn't have enough officers available to attend to the break-in because of 'government spending cuts'

    I thought Brexit was going to ensure the government would be rolling in money?
  • So they had CCTV coverage, but they could not investigate it because there was no CCTV coverage.

    That's some great police work Lou.
  • Peter Sellers  picked a pack of
  • When my garage in Minneapolis was broken into in the late 90's, the Minneapolis Police didn't want to give me the time of day and refused to send anyone out.  They only very reluctantly gave me a 'case number' for insurance.

    Cops can't be bothered with property crimes.  They don't pay off in fines and asset seizures.  Instead they're busy 'community policing'.
  • If they go out of business, there will be even less taxes paid in. Need to invest in a company "therapy" dog.
  • They said they don't have anyone who goes to burglaries anymore

    So from this point forward crime does pay because now all the thieves there know they have nothing to worry about when they go on a burgle spree?

    /If it's not yours, don't touch it.
  • C18H27NO3: They said they don't have anyone who goes to burglaries anymore

    So from this point forward crime does pay because now all the thieves there know they have nothing to worry about when they go on a burgle spree?

    /If it's not yours, don't touch it.


    Hide yo wife!
    Hide yo kids!
  • They are all over the chart. I remember a case a few years ago where they did DNA for a B&E and nothing was even stolen. Sounds like they gotta spread the funding a bit more evenly.
  • Reason #8675309 not to trust the police.
  • E-Bay, the World's Biggest Flea Market for Stolen Goods.
  • Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: When my garage in Minneapolis was broken into in the late 90's, the Minneapolis Police didn't want to give me the time of day and refused to send anyone out.  They only very reluctantly gave me a 'case number' for insurance.

    Cops can't be bothered with property crimes.  They don't pay off in fines and asset seizures.  Instead they're busy 'community policing'.


    Had a similar experience with the Ramsey County Sheriff.

    Had nine 55" displays stolen from "secure" storage ("sorry no CCTV down that lane even though our office is polluted with active CCTV monitors"*) that I'm pretty sure I found on CraigsList.

    I had all 9 serial numbers, so they could look at one for a match and see if this guy was on the up and up or not.

    The seller was 30 miles away and in another county though, so it just wasn't going to happen.

    I ended up eating the loss. Nearly 10k 4 years ago

    * I won't name the storage company, other than to say they are a PUBLIC one
  • Had this happen with someone who stole some recording gear out of my car. Found it online.

    To be fair to the police, they jumped all over that one even though it was found outside their jurisdiction. Drove out there to get the items, interview the staff of the pawn shop where I found one of the items (they played dumb).

    Ended up catching the guy too. Through my case, we were able to tie the guy who robbed me to several other crimes. Those folks got some of their stuff back too.

    /it was a PITA, but worth it, especially when I found out that the additional sleuthing I did helped police to recover a lot more than just my stuff
  • Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: When my garage in Minneapolis was broken into in the late 90's, the Minneapolis Police didn't want to give me the time of day and refused to send anyone out.  They only very reluctantly gave me a 'case number' for insurance.

    Cops can't be bothered with property crimes.  They don't pay off in fines and asset seizures.  Instead they're busy 'community policing'.


    I installed a CCTV system for a guy who owned a garage in a bad part of town. Not long after he had a break in with a bunch of tools stolen. The cops shows up, looks at the footage of the crime (had a nice clear shot of the guy) and he says "Well....I don't know who that guy is, so there isn't much we can do." and leaves. That was the extent of their investigation. See if one cop personally knows the guy who broke in.
    A girl I know had someone break into her house through a window. Cops show up, and she points out finger prints on the window. Cop says "yeah, but those can be anyone's prints. No sense trying to check them." They've been having problems with their neighbors who they suspect have been breaking in and stealing shiat, so they totally cleaned the window. A week later they had another break in. This time a nice clear full hand print was left. They tell the cop they just cleaned the window, and no one had touched it since then. Cop says "There isn't enough print there to do a check." It was an entire farking handprint.
    But why spend time and money investigating crimes when you can *make* money writing tickets?
    Unless some pretty white girl gets raped, then they turn straight up Gattica finding DNA from an eyelash behind a couch.
  • The police simply don't have the manpower to chase down every stolen property case that gets reported to them, in most cases they'll take a report so you can file with your insurance and call it a day. Now if you have a credible lead, they'll likely follow up on it, or if they bust a criminal for some other crime and find your property, they'll get it back to you, but in most cases just let it go, your stuff is gone. Telling people to check ebay and other online sites is actually pretty good advice.
  • I no longer consider the police to be a positive asset to the community.
  • I'm wondering if one couldn't start a police utility, similar to insurance. You pay a set fee every month to, say, Brinks or someone, and if your house gets robbed they will come out and investigate it; some kind of private detective insurance.
  • Sim Tree: I'm wondering if one couldn't start a police utility, similar to insurance. You pay a set fee every month to, say, Brinks or someone, and if your house gets robbed they will come out and investigate it; some kind of private detective insurance.


    You just invented mafia.  Congratulations.
  • Sim Tree: I'm wondering if one couldn't start a police utility, similar to insurance. You pay a set fee every month to, say, Brinks or someone, and if your house gets robbed they will come out and investigate it; some kind of private detective insurance.


    There's no way something like that could be cost effective. You're going to spend a hundred man hours trying to track down someones stolen tv set? Even if you manage to catch the person who stole it, they've already sold it for drugs 15 minutes after they took it. Just get insurance, that's what it's for.
  • ReapTheChaos: Sim Tree: I'm wondering if one couldn't start a police utility, similar to insurance. You pay a set fee every month to, say, Brinks or someone, and if your house gets robbed they will come out and investigate it; some kind of private detective insurance.

    There's no way something like that could be cost effective. You're going to spend a hundred man hours trying to track down someones stolen tv set? Even if you manage to catch the person who stole it, they've already sold it for drugs 15 minutes after they took it. Just get insurance, that's what it's for.


    I have always wwondered, is there someone, somewhere, with a massive stack of used car stereos
  • Hey, UK!  You want vigilantism?  That's how you get vigilantism!
  • Not so CSB, but a friend brought a PS4 from a pawn shop. Long story short, the police knocked on his door a few months later and he had to go down to the station. The *only* reason the police were involved was because the PS4 was taken in a robbery where the owner was tied to a chair in his house and had the shiat kicked out of him. The police found the PS4 through records obtained from Sony because the friend connected his PS4 to PS Network (and why not).

    In the end, they went down to the pawnshop and the detective told them in no uncertain terms that my friend needed a new PS4. A new, PS4.

    // so the moral of the story is don't tie people up for a PS4
    // end csb
  • This shouldn't surprise anyone. Cops almost never investigate property crimes and, even if they did you likely wouldn't see your stuff again. That stuff has been sold for drug money and the criminals are broke as hell so forget restitution. Just file your insurance claim and buy a better lock and/or a gun.
  • MythDragon: Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: When my garage in Minneapolis was broken into in the late 90's, the Minneapolis Police didn't want to give me the time of day and refused to send anyone out.  They only very reluctantly gave me a 'case number' for insurance.

    Cops can't be bothered with property crimes.  They don't pay off in fines and asset seizures.  Instead they're busy 'community policing'.

    I installed a CCTV system for a guy who owned a garage in a bad part of town. Not long after he had a break in with a bunch of tools stolen. The cops shows up, looks at the footage of the crime (had a nice clear shot of the guy) and he says "Well....I don't know who that guy is, so there isn't much we can do." and leaves. That was the extent of their investigation. See if one cop personally knows the guy who broke in.
    A girl I know had someone break into her house through a window. Cops show up, and she points out finger prints on the window. Cop says "yeah, but those can be anyone's prints. No sense trying to check them." They've been having problems with their neighbors who they suspect have been breaking in and stealing shiat, so they totally cleaned the window. A week later they had another break in. This time a nice clear full hand print was left. They tell the cop they just cleaned the window, and no one had touched it since then. Cop says "There isn't enough print there to do a check." It was an entire farking handprint.
    But why spend time and money investigating crimes when you can *make* money writing tickets?
    Unless some pretty white girl gets raped, then they turn straight up Gattica finding DNA from an eyelash behind a couch.


    sounds like it's time to set a trap.  only don't call it that.  call it 'clumsy criminalitis' or something.  "he stepped right into our newly installed laundry chute to the basement, and to make sure the laundry doesn't fall into our sump pump we put a weight triggered lid on it that locks so our pets can't chew up our undies."
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